In some ways, Brett Jackson is the most disappointing prospect of the four in this series. He never had quite Josh Vitters’ pedigree, as Jackson was a very late first round pick (31st overall). It just seemed like he was so darn close to at least being an average MLB regular, providing speed, a solid on base percentage, 15 to 20 home run power, and above average defense in center field, and it came crashing down so quickly. Can Jackson approach his promise again?

The Heights: After speeding through the minors in his first 24 months as a professional baseball player, Jackson put up a fantastic, even for the Pacific Coast League .297/.388/.551 in his first 48 Triple A games, despite striking out in 29.8% of his plate appearances.

The Depths: Jackson’s return to Triple A for the 2012 season resulted in a solid, but unspectacular .256/.338/.479, although the strikeouts only got worse, increasing to 33.8%. The wheels really came off with a call up to the Cubs in early August 2012, when he struck out in more than 40% of his plate appearances and batted just .175. No amount of walking can make up for a batting average and strikeout rate like that. The Cubs tried reworking Jackson’s swing, and it did not take, at least for 2013. Jackson was terrible in both Double A and Triple A, when he was not struggling through injuries.

Best Case Scenario: Jackson somehow is able to get the strikeout rate below 25%, and is able to tap into the power enough to become a rich man’s David DeJesus. Odds are he is a player you’d rather not start regularly against left handed pitching, but he could be one of the better platoon players in baseball, and a starter on a second tier team.

Worst Case Scenario: Jackson keeps striking out in 30% percent of his plate appearances and never sniffs the Majors again. Or, ever worse, he never sniffs the Majors again for the Cubs, gets DFA’d, the Cardinals pick him up, and then they magically fix him with that human sacrifice altar they have under Busch Stadium. Oh yes Cardinals fans, we have discovered your secret.

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Noah Eisner is a Chicago attorney living in the western suburbs with his wife and son (and impending daughter). When he isn’t practicing law or entertaining a toddler, Noah follows Cubs baseball with a focus on the farm system and sabermetric analysis. His Cubs-related ramblings can be followed on Twitter @Noah_Eisner.