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Thursday

26

September 2013

143

COMMENTS

Cubs Win, Blog Update, Cubs Win

Written by , Posted in General


The season is winding to a close (or it did last week, if VFTB is the center of the Cubs’ universe). And the Cubs got a rather unfortunate win on Wednesday. Unfortunate is probably the wrong word; but I especially hate when Cub wins are roundly celebrated by Cardinal fans. In fact, based on where the NL Central now stands I wish the Cards had clinched against the Nationals. Now the Cubs will very likely be in the visitors dugout when STL celebrates avoiding the dreaded play-in Wild Card game. 40,000 in jorts, baseball’s so-called smartest fans, dusting off the rally squirrel t-shirts, feathering their mullets, fiddling with their lone remaining front tooth, sister/wife at their side ready to celebrate with some Skoal and Bud Light…I hate September games at Busch. When all is said and done, the Cubs will finish with fewer than 70 wins, only a handful of games to show for improvement on last season. And dutifully the vast majority of the Cubs faithful give Theo & Co. a second mulligan…

  • On Monday the Cubs state their intentions for the man with the forearm tattoos. In hindsight, it’s a great thing Theo & Jed didn’t make the mistake of hiring Ryne Sandberg two years ago. It takes a special manager to work through the July Fire Sale Festival. Unquestionably, Sveum was uniquely suited for the job – a delicate blend of spineless, non-descript, and devoid of imagination. Seriously though, how anyone can pretend to judge Dale on anything that’s happened over the last two seasons is laughable. The only thing I know for sure is that he’s better than Mike Quade – but then again, even my four-year-old wouldn’t be hitting Jeff Baker cleanup and playing him in LF.
  • If you missed the Brewers-Braves game last night, you need to watch this video. Total respect for what Brian McCann did; I’m not sure I’d even have had the foresight to consider the move. Carlos Gomez is a clown; I don’t care what you have against a guy – that kind of thing is bush league.
  • So much for an extra wild card adding more suspense. Before the season’s final series begin, the NL playoff teams are set, and two divisions only have one team. In the AL you have 3 teams for 2 spots (where before last season you would’ve had 3 teams for 1 spot…that’s less suspense Bud). Plus, 2 of these teams will be in the “playoffs” for exactly one day.
  • If you were born roughly 2,274 days (or more) after the first scheduled night game at Wrigley, this is only the second postseason in your lifetime that will not include the New York Yankees.
  • After 159 games, I consider this season to be even more lost than last year. At least when 2012 ended there was reason to think some of the franchise’s young stars were ready to cement their status as an everyday fixture for the next decade at Wrigley. Then Rizzo didn’t hit as well, Samardzija pitched much worse, and a bunch of coaches decided Castro should stop doing everything that made him so valuable. Along the way, only Junior Lake added his name to the ‘Cubs of Tomorrow’ plan – and even he has been a weird combination of electric and ineffective. At this point, I could be convinced that any of those players is traded before 2014 ends; and I could also be convinced that any of them would be a 2014 All-Star.
  • PLCB3

    2274/365 ≈ 6.23

    ((2274/365) – 6) * 365 = 84.
    84-43 = 41.
    23 days left in August after August 8 leaves 18 days of September, which means September 18, 1994.
    Wait a second. There was a strike in 1994 and the season was cancelled in August!!!

    • Jedi

      I said roughly specifically to avoid this type of tomfoolery.

      • You should have stuck to the soup statistics.

      • Jerry in Wisconsin

        The alphabet variety?

      • You should have stuck to the soup statistics.

      • Jerry in Wisconsin

        The alphabet variety?

    • Jedi

      Your calculation is off by the way…but then that was to be expected.

      http://www.timeanddate.com/date/durationresult.html?m1=8&d1=8&y1=1988&m2=10&d2=30&y2=1994

      • PLCB3

        The minus 43 part is in reference to my age on 8/8/88

      • Jedi

        Wait you thought this was about you? Narcissist.

      • Jedi, EVERYTHING is about him. Didn’t you know?

      • PLCB3

        I did the original calculation without accounting for my birthday and got the end of October date, and then I was like wait that can’t be possible. That’s why I took out 43 days

      • Seymour Buts

        Did you account for the effect of gamma rays on man in the moon marigolds?

      • PLCB3

        Who do you think I am? Professor Frink?

    • Jedi

      Your calculation is off by the way…but then that was to be expected.

      http://www.timeanddate.com/date/durationresult.html?m1=8&d1=8&y1=1988&m2=10&d2=30&y2=1994

      • AC0000000

        The minus 43 part is in reference to my age on 8/8/88

      • Jedi

        Wait you thought this was about you? Narcissist.

      • Jedi, EVERYTHING is about him. Didn’t you know?

      • AC0000000

        I did the original calculation without accounting for my birthday and got the end of October date, and then I was like wait that can’t be possible. That’s why I took out 43 days

      • Seymour Buts

        Did you account for the effect of gamma rays on man in the moon marigolds?

  • Eddie Von White

    For what it’s worth, Sveum’s winning percentage as a Cub manager is about 70 percentage points less than Mike Quade’s was.


    And what happened to Raker? I was really getting used to his commentaries every day.

  • Doug S.

    Take a sample from Gomez. He’ll surely fail the asshole test.

  • Doug S.

    Take a sample from Gomez. He’ll surely fail the asshole test.

  • I’m curious what exactly you want your manager to say in the post-game interview. He seems to be pretty spot on in my book. Often times games are decided by a play or two, and they are self-explanatory. But, whatever. Sveum has tattoos.

    • Jedi

      I don’t need him to say anything – but it’d be nice to at least have a manager who seems to be in control of his team and fighting for his players. My impression of Dale is that he does what Theo wants every time and his confrontations with umpires have seemed more vociferous when he thinks they’ve attacked him personally rather than when one of his players has been cheated in some way.

      But again, the front office has completely neutered him from Day 1. So his 2 years with the Cubs may have zero bearing on how he’d manage if his overlords weren’t micromanaging his moves and trading away anything of value.

      As a caretaker, he’s been fine. But to be successful you need more than merely a caretaker manager. And actually, I think Dale will be back next year – Theo & Co. know that if they pretend not to like the job that Dale has been doing, Cubs fans might actually expect something different in 2014. But if they keep Dale, just tack on another year to that ‘wait til next year’ clock.

      • Chuck

        To be perfectly honest, I am mildly surprised at how many wins Dale was able to squeeze out of this rotten roster. It is also almost impossible to gauge how good a manager is when he has to manage to directives given by his bosses (Theo and Co.) rather than trying to win games. His bullpen management was pretty good considering he had only a handful of reliable and competent pitchers in the pen.

        One thing I am disappointed by is the lack of taking advantage of platoons with a roster of OFs just begging to be platooned. Do we hold him at least partially responsible for an air-head SS? I don’t know.

        I do not know if Dale is a good or bad manager. Winning percentage is a poor metric for this club at this time.

      • Chuck

        To be perfectly honest, I am mildly surprised at how many wins Dale was able to squeeze out of this rotten roster. It is also almost impossible to gauge how good a manager is when he has to manage to directives given by his bosses (Theo and Co.) rather than trying to win games. His bullpen management was pretty good considering he had only a handful of reliable and competent pitchers in the pen.

        One thing I am disappointed by is the lack of taking advantage of platoons with a roster of OFs just begging to be platooned. Do we hold him at least partially responsible for an air-head SS? I don’t know.

        I do not know if Dale is a good or bad manager. Winning percentage is a poor metric for this club at this time.

      • He is the guy who sits in the dugout

      • Jedi

        If he’s really so insignificant, then why bother hiring one at all?…let the hitting coach send up pinch-hitters, the pitching coach can remove pitchers, and the Front Office can send down the lineup before each game.

        But look at the list of World Series winners – when is the last winner whose manager wasn’t heralded as a major reason for the success? Probably the ’01 Diamondbacks. Before that, maybe the 1990 Reds? So in 25 years, only two teams have won without a manager who was a noted reason for the success.

        Just because Ron Washington can manage a team AND do lines off his desk during the national anthem doesn’t mean that a manager who does blow is the way to go.

      • Jeremiah Johnson

        That last paragraph is poetry.

      • PLCB3

        You forgot to mention Ozzie with the 05 White Sox. You could also argue Tito with the 04 Red Sox since the 2003 team was one move away

      • Jedi

        You pick two teams that perhaps make your point the least. I didn’t forget anything…

        At the time, huge credit was given to Ozzie for doing things his way – the team had largely taken on his aggressive persona and that had propelled them to a title.

        The 2003 & 2004 Red Sox are a case study in why a manager makes a difference. In 2003 most Red Sox fans would tell you that Grady Little is to BLAME for the Red Sox NOT winning the ALCS…meanwhile the difference in 2004 was that Francona’s steady hand gave them confidence while in an 0-3 hole – and that the singular move of pinch-running Dave Roberts was what ultimately propelled them to a championship.

        So well done on making the exact opposite of your point.

      • PLCB3

        First off, the move in question was not pulling Pedro in game 7. Second, it proves my point, because the team was already built. As for the White Sox, I still stand by my argument that they were lucky. Everyone on that team had career years and none of their playoff opponents were able to line up their pitching.

      • Jedi

        “Second, it proves my point, because the team was already built.”

        It proves your point? Besides the fact that the rest of your post makes no sense, how does it prove your point?

        2003: Team fails because of manager
        2004: Same team, new manager = success

        So where in there exactly is proof of your point that the World Series champion Red Sox manager was insignificant? You can say they were one move away if you like – but that one move was a new manager!

      • PLCB3

        So if Grady Little pulls Pedro and the Red Sox win game 7 and then go on to win the 2003 WS, would Little not have a role in it? Because if he pulls Pedro, no one says anything. It became an issue in 2004 because of what happened the year before. Or Grady Little pulls Pedro and then the pen blows it. Grady Little isn’t fired, and the same team rallies from the 3-0 deficit the next year

      • Jedi

        You’re playing some odd theoretical game. The question is whether managers have received a great deal of credit for propelling/guiding/leading the last several World Series teams to victory. Inarguably, they have. You can argue the merits of that, but you really can’t argue that the winning manager has received a great deal of credit – indicating that a manager does indeed matter.

        The point being, given the current situation with the Cubs, I don’t see Dale as the kind of guy who has ever set himself up to receive credit OR blame. He’s essentially a paid yes-man who doesn’t deviate from the path that the front office has mapped out for him. Some people pay their manager to make decisions – the Cubs have instead are paying Dale to make no decisions. They want the exact opposite from their manager; not a free-thinker, but a baby-sitter. I say that’s not ever going to be a formula for success.

      • PLCB3

        The case with the Red Sox, that decision about pulling Pedro in game 7 only becomes magnified because Pedro blew it.

        And why do you say Brenley was not a major reason for Arizona winning in 2001? Because they rode Schilling and Johnson the entire year?

      • Jedi

        “Second, it proves my point, because the team was already built.”

        It proves your point? Besides the fact that the rest of your post makes no sense, how does it prove your point?

        2003: Team fails because of manager
        2004: Same team, new manager = success

        So where in there exactly is proof of your point that the World Series champion Red Sox manager was insignificant? You can say they were one move away if you like – but that one move was a new manager!

      • AC0000000

        So if Grady Little pulls Pedro and the Red Sox win game 7 and then go on to win the 2003 WS, would Little not have a role in it? Because if he pulls Pedro, no one says anything. It became an issue in 2004 because of what happened the year before. Or Grady Little pulls Pedro and then the pen blows it. Grady Little isn’t fired, and the same team rallies from the 3-0 deficit the next year

      • Jedi

        You’re playing some odd theoretical game. The question is whether managers have received a great deal of credit for propelling/guiding/leading the last several World Series teams to victory. Inarguably, they have. You can argue the merits of that, but you really can’t argue that the winning manager has received a great deal of credit – indicating that a manager does indeed matter.

        The point being, given the current situation with the Cubs, I don’t see Dale as the kind of guy who has ever set himself up to receive credit OR blame. He’s essentially a paid yes-man who doesn’t deviate from the path that the front office has mapped out for him. Some people pay their manager to make decisions – the Cubs have instead are paying Dale to make no decisions. They want the exact opposite from their manager; not a free-thinker, but a baby-sitter. I say that’s not ever going to be a formula for success.

      • AC0000000

        The case with the Red Sox, that decision about pulling Pedro in game 7 only becomes magnified because Pedro blew it.

        And why do you say Brenley was not a major reason for Arizona winning in 2001? Because they rode Schilling and Johnson the entire year?

      • On the flip side of that, how many actual decisions do you think any given manager makes during a game?

      • PLCB3

        Other than making the lineup, just a few decisions during a tight game. When to pull the starter, what relievers to bring in, who to pinch-hit for and when, defense, and pinch-runners.

      • Thanks for biting on my rhetoric. But, yeah. I’d say it is even more trivial than that..those things are pretty self explanatory. The actual work lies in the coaching staff, and the manager is pretty much the staff’s spokesperson.

      • PLCB3

        In what way does the work lie with the coaches?

      • The work of coaching baseball is that of the coaching staff. Introducing scenarios and developing plans of attack. Scouting the opposition…making game plans…figuring out shifts…keeping players on the field…

      • PLCB3

        So what you’re saying is the manager is involved with all that but he is the head spokesperson of that group?

      • Jedi

        I don’t buy it. And I’m not placing his worth in when he chooses to double-switch – good managers are valuable because they put players in a position to succeed and then get them all pulling towards a common goal. Love them or hate them, LaRussa, Torre, Cox – they all had that ability.

      • PLCB3

        So now how does that mean Brenly wasn’t a big part of the 2001 Arizona team?

      • Jedi

        CAPS – you might have seen that my reply was NOT directed to you.

        I never said Brenly wasn’t a big part of the team; I merely indicated that commonly, he is not credited as a big reason why that team won. You even seem to be aware of this, as you even made mention of the reason most people cite. They had the best frontline tandem of any team, perhaps ever. What’s funny is that during the course of his many years as a Cubs announcers, Brenly himself even commented on how little credit he received for that team. But of course you wouldn’t know that since you don’t watch the games…

      • PLCB3

        So Brenly doesn’t get credit because he rode Schilling and Johnson, but in that 2001 World Series, he throws Schilling on short rest twice so that he can get 5 starts from him and Johnson. And then game 7, he brings in Johnson in relief? Not too many managers would have done that.

        But now Tito gets credit for the 2004 Red Sox that was for the most part the same team as the 2003 team because he pulled Pedro from game 7 before he could blow it, unlike Little who didn’t pull Pedro from game 7?

      • Jedi

        Weren’t you going to give us a break for a week or something at one point…did that offer have an expiration date?

        Keep trying to pick the fight, I’m not interested.

      • PLCB3

        It did have an expiration date actually. Don’t worry I won’t be on this weekend though. I’m not trying to pick a fight, I’m trying to establish the reasoning here.

      • Dale Sveum with any of those rosters is your favorite manager in the world. Even with the tats. The common goal is winning, and collections of good baseball players end up winning games regardless of coaching. I imagine talking to adults like Little Leaguers would somehow derail things.

      • Jedi

        And if all a manager did was make in-game decisions, a computer would suffice.

      • PLCB3

        It worked for Lisa. And it worked for the Moneyball Oakland teams

      • Jedi

        Art Howe would tell you that his forced adherence to whatever Billy Beane decreed is why those A’s teams never won anything. So I wouldn’t exactly say it worked out.

      • PLCB3

        And look how bad Howe sucked with the Mets despite having a big market budget and a talented roster.
        Besides, once you make the playoffs in baseball, anyone can win. I would say the Oakland A’s were a much more successful team from 2000-2006 than the trash were in that time frame.
        Also, no one points out that the A’s were anchored by 3 aces that they had cheap, Isringhausen to close out games, and an offense that had Giambi, Dye, Tejada, Damon, and Chavez.

      • Jedi

        When does your weekend start?

      • PLCB3

        Around 6 or 7. I’m going camping, I won’t have internet, and I am going to turn off my phone. I’m only bringing my computer and phone for emergencies. It’ll be like that car commercial where the guys are driving until they reach a place with no phone signal.

      • Doug S.

        You guys are priceless.

      • AC0000000

        And look how bad Howe sucked with the Mets despite having a big market budget and a talented roster.
        Besides, once you make the playoffs in baseball, anyone can win. I would say the Oakland A’s were a much more successful team from 2000-2006 than the trash were in that time frame.
        Also, no one points out that the A’s were anchored by 3 aces that they had cheap, Isringhausen to close out games, and an offense that had Giambi, Dye, Tejada, Damon, and Chavez.

      • Jedi

        When does your weekend start?

      • AC0000000

        Around 6 or 7. I’m going camping, I won’t have internet, and I am going to turn off my phone. I’m only bringing my computer and phone for emergencies. It’ll be like that car commercial where the guys are driving until they reach a place with no phone signal.

      • Doug S.

        You guys are priceless.

      • Jerry in Wisconsin

        Wasn’t Dale a hitting coach? I believe Theo has done what you suggested, but instead of the pitching coach going out Dale does to promote the idea we have a manager.

      • He is the guy who sits in the dugout

      • Jedi

        If he’s really so insignificant, then why bother hiring one at all?…let the hitting coach send up pinch-hitters, the pitching coach can remove pitchers, and the Front Office can send down the lineup before each game.

        But look at the list of World Series winners – when is the last winner whose manager wasn’t heralded as a major reason for the success? Probably the ’01 Diamondbacks. Before that, maybe the 1990 Reds? So in 25 years, only two teams have won without a manager who was a noted reason for the success.

        Just because Ron Washington can manage a team AND do lines off his desk during the national anthem doesn’t mean that a manager who does blow is the way to go.

      • Jeremiah Johnson

        That last paragraph is poetry.

      • AC0000000

        You forgot to mention Ozzie with the 05 White Sox. You could also argue Tito with the 04 Red Sox since the 2003 team was one move away

      • Jedi

        You pick two teams that perhaps make your point the least. I didn’t forget anything…

        At the time, huge credit was given to Ozzie for doing things his way – the team had largely taken on his aggressive persona and that had propelled them to a title.

        The 2003 & 2004 Red Sox are a case study in why a manager makes a difference. In 2003 most Red Sox fans would tell you that Grady Little is to BLAME for the Red Sox NOT winning the ALCS…meanwhile the difference in 2004 was that Francona’s steady hand gave them confidence while in an 0-3 hole – and that the singular move of pinch-running Dave Roberts was what ultimately propelled them to a championship.

        So well done on making the exact opposite of your point.

      • On the flip side of that, how many actual decisions do you think any given manager makes during a game?

      • AC0000000

        Other than making the lineup, just a few decisions during a tight game. When to pull the starter, what relievers to bring in, who to pinch-hit for and when, defense, and pinch-runners.

      • Thanks for biting on my rhetoric. But, yeah. I’d say it is even more trivial than that..those things are pretty self explanatory. The actual work lies in the coaching staff, and the manager is pretty much the staff’s spokesperson.

      • AC0000000

        In what way does the work lie with the coaches?

      • The work of coaching baseball is that of the coaching staff. Introducing scenarios and developing plans of attack. Scouting the opposition…making game plans…figuring out shifts…keeping players on the field…

      • AC0000000

        So what you’re saying is the manager is involved with all that but he is the head spokesperson of that group?

      • Jedi

        I don’t buy it. And I’m not placing his worth in when he chooses to double-switch – good managers are valuable because they put players in a position to succeed and then get them all pulling towards a common goal. Love them or hate them, LaRussa, Torre, Cox – they all had that ability.

      • AC0000000

        So now how does that mean Brenly wasn’t a big part of the 2001 Arizona team?

      • Jedi

        CAPS – you might have seen that my reply was NOT directed to you.

        I never said Brenly wasn’t a big part of the team; I merely indicated that commonly, he is not credited as a big reason why that team won. You even seem to be aware of this, as you even made mention of the reason most people cite. They had the best frontline tandem of any team, perhaps ever. What’s funny is that during the course of his many years as a Cubs announcers, Brenly himself even commented on how little credit he received for that team. But of course you wouldn’t know that since you don’t watch the games…

      • AC0000000

        So Brenly doesn’t get credit because he rode Schilling and Johnson, but in that 2001 World Series, he throws Schilling on short rest twice so that he can get 5 starts from him and Johnson. And then game 7, he brings in Johnson in relief? Not too many managers would have done that.

        But now Tito gets credit for the 2004 Red Sox that was for the most part the same team as the 2003 team because he pulled Pedro from game 7 before he could blow it, unlike Little who didn’t pull Pedro from game 7?

      • Jedi

        Weren’t you going to give us a break for a week or something at one point…did that offer have an expiration date?

        Keep trying to pick the fight, I’m not interested.

      • AC0000000

        It did have an expiration date actually. Don’t worry I won’t be on this weekend though. I’m not trying to pick a fight, I’m trying to establish the reasoning here.

      • Dale Sveum with any of those rosters is your favorite manager in the world. Even with the tats. The common goal is winning, and collections of good baseball players end up winning games regardless of coaching. I imagine talking to adults like Little Leaguers would somehow derail things.

      • Jedi

        And if all a manager did was make in-game decisions, a computer would suffice.

      • AC0000000

        It worked for Lisa. And it worked for the Moneyball Oakland teams

      • Jerry in Wisconsin

        Wasn’t Dale a hitting coach? I believe Theo has done what you suggested, but instead of the pitching coach going out Dale does to promote the idea we have a manager.

      • Jeremiah Johnson

        Agreed that Dale will be back next season. Not sure how they can make a case that he could have done much more with the scraps he’s had. Plus, who would they bring in? Managing these Cubs isn’t a job many guys are likely to line up for–not when you’re still a couple seasons (conservative estimate) away from being consistently competitive.

        But all is not lost. Keith Law likes what we’re doing with our farm system. Yay!

      • Jeremiah Johnson

        Agreed that Dale will be back next season. Not sure how they can make a case that he could have done much more with the scraps he’s had. Plus, who would they bring in? Managing these Cubs isn’t a job many guys are likely to line up for–not when you’re still a couple seasons (conservative estimate) away from being consistently competitive.

        But all is not lost. Keith Law likes what we’re doing with our farm system. Yay!

  • Doc Raker

    No one outside of the organization knows the true value of Swammy with this roster. Managers manage big league ego’s, mostly off camera and out of sight of hard hitting journalist like Muskrat and the rest. Sure we know how he managed the bullpen but we don’t know much else.

    I think Travis Wood made his value known along with the fireball throwing reliever Strop.

    What did the coaches tell Starlin Castro to change?

    • Jedi

      Everything. But particularly his reckless aggression at the plate.

      http://espn.go.com/blog/chicago/cubs/post/_/id/20008/epstein-cubs-done-tinkering-with-castro

      • Doc Raker

        What dumbass takes a young kid who hit .300 in his first two seasons and tinkers? You don’t mess with that type of success.

      • Jedi

        Be careful, there is a large contingent of fans that think Theo can do no wrong and his presence has the Cubs destined for greatness.

      • Doc Raker

        I think you have it backwards. The Cubs tried to make Starlin more selective, not aggressive, as in wait for the right pitch to drive, not swing aggressively or recklessly. Sometimes when you are to selective you end up hitting behind in counts which makes you susceptible to out pitches. Hitting the first pitch in your zone is what Starlin does with success. I think hitting your pitch even early in the count is a good approach, obviously it worked for him in season 1 and 2.

      • Jedi

        What do I have backwards? You asked what the coaches told him to change…my reply was that they asked him to change his reckless aggression.

      • Chuck

        I teach my USSSA players to ignore the ball count (to a point, I mean if the pitcher is throwing them to the backstop I would give them the Stop sign) and just concentrate on the strike count. 0-1 strike, look for your pitch to drive. 2 strikes, protect and just put it in play. I never have them just put the bat on their shoulder and just wait to walk. If the first pitch in your AB is right down the middle, drive it to the fence. It may be the best pitch you see all AB. I call it being selectively aggressive.

        One of the hardest things in baseball to learn is what pitches NOT to swing at with 2 strikes.

      • Eddie Von White

        Theo’s a young kid himself.

      • Doc Raker

        What dumbass takes a young kid who hit .300 in his first two seasons and tinkers? You don’t mess with that type of success.

      • Jedi

        Be careful, there is a large contingent of fans that think Theo can do no wrong and his presence has the Cubs destined for greatness.

      • Doc Raker

        I think you have it backwards. The Cubs tried to make Starlin more selective, not aggressive, as in wait for the right pitch to drive, not swing aggressively or recklessly. Sometimes when you are to selective you end up hitting behind in counts which makes you susceptible to out pitches. Hitting the first pitch in your zone is what Starlin does with success. I think hitting your pitch even early in the count is a good approach, obviously it worked for him in season 1 and 2.

      • Jedi

        What do I have backwards? You asked what the coaches told him to change…my reply was that they asked him to change his reckless aggression.

      • Chuck

        I teach my USSSA players to ignore the ball count (to a point, I mean if the pitcher is throwing them to the backstop I would give them the Stop sign) and just concentrate on the strike count. 0-1 strike, look for your pitch to drive. 2 strikes, protect and just put it in play. I never have them just put the bat on their shoulder and just wait to walk. If the first pitch in your AB is right down the middle, drive it to the fence. It may be the best pitch you see all AB. I call it being selectively aggressive.

        One of the hardest things in baseball to learn is what pitches NOT to swing at with 2 strikes.

      • Eddie Von White

        Theo’s a young kid himself.

  • Doc Raker

    No one outside of the organization knows the true value of Swammy with this roster. Managers manage big league ego’s, mostly off camera and out of sight of hard hitting journalist like Muskrat and the rest. Sure we know how he managed the bullpen but we don’t know much else.

    I think Travis Wood made his value known along with the fireball throwing reliever Strop.

    What did the coaches tell Starlin Castro to change?

  • Chuck

    Again, where am I supposed to send this $100?

    • Doc Raker

      The Families of Spinal Muscular Atrophy thank you. http://Www.fsma.org

      • Chuck

        I will send that in this weekend when I pay bills. I believe we should do this again next season with a different over/under. Nobody loses this bet. There are only winners.

    • cap’n Obvious

      this is class. I will match the hundred. A few people here know how fantastic this organization is…this is way better than betting dinner. These people help people.

  • Chuck

    Again, where am I supposed to send this $100?

    • Doc Raker

      The Families of Spinal Muscular Atrophy thank you. http://Www.fsma.org

      • Chuck

        I will send that in this weekend when I pay bills. I believe we should do this again next season with a different over/under. Nobody loses this bet. There are only winners.

    • cap’n Obvious

      this is class. I will match the hundred. A few people here know how fantastic this organization is…this is way better than betting dinner. These people help people.

  • Jedi

    Supplanting last week’s best Cubs’ news of the year…

    http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/9727367/mlb-commissioner-bud-selig-retire-2014-season

    • PLCB3

      Bud Selig is like Brett Favre. Selig first said he’d retire 10 years ago

    • PLCB3

      If you added Bud Selig’s name to the list of players by salary, Selig would be at the top of the list. He makes in the neighborhood of 20M a year. He’s not going to step down anytime soon.

  • Jedi

    Supplanting last week’s best Cubs’ news of the year…

    http://espn.go.com/mlb/story/_/id/9727367/mlb-commissioner-bud-selig-retire-2014-season

    • AC0000000

      Bud Selig is like Brett Favre. Selig first said he’d retire 10 years ago

    • AC0000000

      If you added Bud Selig’s name to the list of players by salary, Selig would be at the top of the list. He makes in the neighborhood of 20M a year. He’s not going to step down anytime soon.

  • Doc Raker

    The Andrew Cashner Anthony Rizzo trade is looking like the Padres got the better of that deal so far. Please raise your hand if you though Anthony Rizzo was the second coming of Billy Williams?

    • Jerry in Wisconsin

      I always thought that the trade could come back to bite Jed. All Cashner needed to do was prove he could stay healthy a full season as a starter. He clearly had talent.

    • Chuck

      I have my hand half raised and it is way too early to call this. The biggest knock on Cashner was durability, not stuff. While Rizzo has not progressed as I would have liked (who on the Cubs has), but his numbers this year are league-average at the ripe old age of 23. That is not something to sneeze at.

      I would give my left nut to get Castro back to league-average at 23…

  • Doc Raker

    The Andrew Cashner Anthony Rizzo trade is looking like the Padres got the better of that deal so far. Please raise your hand if you though Anthony Rizzo was the second coming of Billy Williams?

    • Jerry in Wisconsin

      I always thought that the trade could come back to bite Jed. All Cashner needed to do was prove he could stay healthy a full season as a starter. He clearly had talent.

    • Chuck

      I have my hand half raised and it is way too early to call this. The biggest knock on Cashner was durability, not stuff. While Rizzo has not progressed as I would have liked (who on the Cubs has), but his numbers this year are league-average at the ripe old age of 23. That is not something to sneeze at.

      I would give my left nut to get Castro back to league-average at 23…

  • Eddie Von White

    Peter Gammons is reporting that Brad Ausmus is going to replace Dale Sveum as manager of the Cubs.

    • Chuck

      Why?

      • Here’s to ending the season with a solid ass-handing.

      • PLCB3

        If I get to celebrate Cardinals Elimination Day, it’ll be okay. None of the teams I hate are in other than the Cardinals.

      • He is better at shaving and has fewer tattooed forearms.

  • Eddie Von White

    Peter Gammons is reporting that Brad Ausmus is going to replace Dale Sveum as manager of the Cubs.

    • Chuck

      Why?

      • He is better at shaving and has fewer tattooed forearms.

  • Seymour Butts

    We scored, Yea!
    One more game to go and then we can all not give a shit about the post season.

    • Chuck

      That ship sailed for me some time in June.

  • Seymour Butts

    We scored, Yea!
    One more game to go and then we can all not give a shit about the post season.

    • Chuck

      That ship sailed for me some time in June.

  • Seymour Butts

    Season Over.
    Finish in tie for 4th draft spot.
    Anyone know how the tie is broken?

    • PLCB3

      Way to go Cubs, first giving the division to the Cardinals, then letting them sweep you and get home-field advantage. Absolutely lovely. I predict the Cardinals will be raising banner #12 this year. That will be the 3rd Cardinals World Series championship I will have had to endure in my lifetime. Along with the trash’s championship in 2005.

      • Eddie Von White

        You sound angry.

  • Seymour Butts

    Season Over.
    Finish in tie for 4th draft spot.
    Anyone know how the tie is broken?

    • AC0000000

      Way to go Cubs, first giving the division to the Cardinals, then letting them sweep you and get home-field advantage. Absolutely lovely. I predict the Cardinals will be raising banner #12 this year. That will be the 3rd Cardinals World Series championship I will have had to endure in my lifetime. Along with the trash’s championship in 2005.

      • Eddie Von White

        You sound angry.

  • Here’s to ending the season with a solid ass-handing.

    • AC0000000

      If I get to celebrate Cardinals Elimination Day, it’ll be okay. None of the teams I hate are in other than the Cardinals.