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Talking Cubs Baseball Since 2003

Monday

19

August 2013

70

COMMENTS

Embarrassing: Umpires, Manager, Shortstop

Written by , Posted in General

If you missed the Cubs this weekend, you certainly missed controversy.

This actually happened.

Joe Torre (in charge of Major League Operations, On-Field Operations, On-Field Discipline and Umpiring) needs to act. Home plate umpire Phil Cuzzi doesn’t need to be making that call; and if he does and the entire Cubs bench looks surprised and angry, would it really kill him to ask for help? It’s this behavior from officials that EVERY other major professional sport has successfully gotten under control. In basketball, football, and hockey you see officials huddle together when one of them has clearly butchered a call. But baseball is more like tennis – some crotchety old guy tyrannically interpreting the rules through his own faulty vision, insistent that he couldn’t possibly need help. If Cuzzi had bothered to consult Chris Guccione at first base, I’m still not sure they’d have gotten it right – that’s how bad umpires are these days, protecting one another until the bitter end. Not until the league starts making examples out of these guys (and I mean firing the worst of them – Angel Hernandez!) will any of them bother to change their ways. Just look at this list – you should only know a couple of those guys by name…instead I know at least a dozen of those guys simply because of an ignominious decision they’ve made at a crucial time. And many of them – like Cuzzi’s ridiculous call on Sunday – could’ve been avoided if umpires were just a little less ‘it’s us against the world’ all the time.

Because of Cuzzi’s absurd punchout, both Dale Sveum and James Russell were ejected on Sunday. I really wish more of the team had forced an ejection – Baseball Tonight will give a few minutes to the bad call, but the Cubs could’ve really put some momentum behind the umpire-hating if they’d gotten ejected en masse. Dale looked intent to get tossed though; but he was probably still sour from Saturday…

When this happened.

If you haven’t yet heard the commentary that accompanies the video that I linked to, you need to watch that. I think it’s the best explanation of exactly what happened on that play – again, terrible umpiring (in my opinion anyway, admittedly this is debatable). You don’t call the infield fly rule as the ball is falling into Castro’s glove in LF. As the announcer says in that piece, the ENTIRE Cubs team relaxed when Castro caught the ball because generally you don’t have to worry about advancing players on an infield fly. Embarrassing play, no excuse to let the guy score but can we please stop pretending as if this dramatically altered the course of the game? The Cubs didn’t score in this game. AT ALL.

You know what will affect winning? Regularly embarrassing your young talent at every chance. No idea what Dale thought he was accomplishing by yanking Castro from the game at the end of that half inning. It solves nothing, it teaches nothing. All it does it put the conversation right back on Castro’s shortcomings (perceived or otherwise); not usually a great tactic for inspiring and encouraging one of your best assets. This was not an Andruw Jones refusal to run hard to a catchable fly ball. And Castro’s response (as it has been EVERY single time something like this happens) was perfect; he takes full responsible, never says anything that sounds like a partial excuse. I thought pulling him from the game was a cowardly move. Exactly when has Dale stood up for Castro? He seems quite happy to throw him to the wolves whenever possible.

I’m of the opinion that a fair amount of Cubs fans just need a team pariah. And in the absence of someone who blossoms into the role like Sammy Sosa, someone who earns it right out of the gate like Milton Bradley, or someone who did a bit of both like Carlos Zambrano, Castro has ‘earned’ the role because basically he rubs people the wrong way. He swings at bad pitches, he has bad posture, he makes a mess of the routine. And for all of this, the 23-year-old is called lazy, disinterested, and a whole lot worse with regularity. Never mind that he has yet to make any excuse for one of these shortcomings, in fact he owns up to it so quickly, I think the media enjoys heaping it on him as quickly as possible (much like they did to Zambrano at times). I’d be curious to know how it’s all perceived by Soler, Almora, Baez, Bryant and the rest of the Cubs’ prospects…because personally, I don’t think there’s a place in baseball where the fans are setup for more unrealistic expectations of the future. I’d love to see Cub fans stop eating their young.


Ryan Dempster beaned A-Rod…who then propelled the Yankees to a come-from-behind win against the Red Sox.

Miguel Tejada says he was banned because MLB won’t give him a medical waiver for a doctor prescribed pill that he needs to take. (This is where Bud Selig tries to explain how Ryan Braun gets to negotiate the terms of his suspension, but Tejada can’t take something that a doctor says he needs…of course this would all shake out the same way if Selig had never owned the Brewers)

I’d be thrilled if I thought this kid would do any hard time…but he won’t.


State of the System

Bullpen

by Rob Willer

Top Prospect: Tony Zych

Bio: Zych attended St Rita High school in Chicago Illinois, he then attended the University of Louisville to continue on his baseball career. Finally the Cubs drafted Zych in the 4th round of the 2011 draft after trying to draft him in 2008 in the 46th round. Zych was finally coming home to Chicago to start his professional career with his hometown Cubbies. He measures at 6 foot 3 and 190 pounds according to baseballreference.com. In his first year in the Cubs organization, he split time with the Rookie League and the Boise Hawks. Zych’s numbers ended up being a 2.25 earned run average in four games pitched (three games finished) over his span with both clubs. He also registered an eight strikeout to three walk ratio in his first season in the Cubs organization.

2012-2013 Season: After showing success in the rookie league as well as Boise in the short season league the Cubs decided to move Zych to the High A Affiliate Daytona Cubs. Zych pitched in 27 games (24 Games Finished) over his Daytona tenure where he had an earned run average of 3.19 with 36 strikeouts in 36 and 2/3 innings. After registering similar success in the Florida St. League, Zych got the call-up to the Double A Affiliate the Tennessee Smokies. Zych’s number’s at the Double A level were not as encouraging as Daytona as he struggled to a 4.38 earned run average in 20 games. He did however register 28 strikeouts in 24 innings which was good for a better than one strikeout per innings. The 2013 season is where Zych finally broke out, Zych has pitched in 41 games (14 games finished) where his earned run average is below three (2.52 to be exact). He has pitched 50 innings which shows he has been a durable reliever for Double A Tennessee. Most likely Zych will finish out the year with the Smokies and hopefully get some playoff appearance with them and start next season with Triple A Iowa.

Sleeper Prospect- Trey Masek

Masek attended Texas Tech University where he started to make a name for himself with continuance of dominance against Big 12 opponents. This past June Masek was drafted by the Chicago Cubs in the 5th round of the 2013 amateur draft. Masek measures at 6 foot 1 and 185 pounds which is pretty close to the prototypical pitcher in today’s game. So far Masek has pitched in two different leagues for the Cubs this summer. He first went to Arizona to shake off some of the rest which the draft period attributes to. Masek’s stats with the Boise Hawks consist of 1.20 earned run average in 9 games where he struck out 18 in 15 innings pitched.

Masek was drafted as a starting pitcher but most likely will end up as a relief pitcher in the near future. With his work ethic and high baseball IQ i see no reason for failure at the big league level. Over time I can see Masek and Zych becoming the closers of the future for the Chicago Cubs. Masek will start next season at either Kane County (Low A) or Daytona Cubs (High A) depending on member involvement. In my mind Masek, has the potential to be very dominant in the pen, maybe not so much Miguel Cabrera but a decent OPS and slugging percentage never hurt a player.


by Joe Aiello

I decided to add this section to the morning posts because it’s important to give you, the reader, as much time away from work as possible during the day and the way to accomplish that is to not only make the posts longer, but to get them more interactive by starting a discussion. So with that, let’s get right to it with a topic that is sure to apply to both stat guys and scout guys.

When evaluating players, there are many things that people favor. Some like stats and believe you can make the majority of the decisions based on the numbers, whereas others say stats are helpful, but that it’s your eyes that need to be the guide. If we cater to both groups, I want to know what would be the most important thing you’re looking for.

For stat guys, if you were given one stat and one stat only that you could see on a player, which stat would you choose to use to evaluate pitchers and which would you use to evaluate hitters? Remember, you can’t see the player play and you can see no other numbers other than that one stat. Also, why do you choose the stat you do?

For the scout guys, what one tool do to most value when you see a batter hit and a pitcher pitch? If you’re scouting and somehow can only see one tool for the hitter, what would you most value? Why?

  • Joe Aiello

    “I’d love to see Cub fans stop eating their young.”
    Jedi, I couldn’t have said it better. One of the things I hate most about Cub fans and really, sports fans in general, is that they want everything right now and when they don’t get it at all times, they unleash hell. It’s like the annoying kid from Willy Wonka that wants everything. Or the kid from Caddyshack. I feel like just telling Cub fans to shut up. You’ll get nothing and like it.

    • Sean Powell

      In order to avoid controversy, I will not comment

    • maria

      I get no pleasure from bad mouthing any player; however, the call for patience with a player like Castro is a waste of time. He has been playing baseball for years and he still can’t seem interested, stand up straight, run the bases, or master situational hitting? It’s one thing to be short on talent, but quite another to be short on brains. Unless a player has off-the-charts talent (Castro does not), you have to play smart. Castro has never demonstrated that. Plus, the Cubs have never demonstrated any ability to change players like Castro. The next challenge is to see if the Cubs can alter Rizzo’s long list of mental mistakes.

  • Doug S.

    Interesting point. Mostly I’ve had ‘that guy’ on the Cubs that I really didn’t like. Not so these days, they’re all gone thanks to the current administration. I don’t believe I miss it. Castro won’t be it for me even though he drives me nuts with his wild swinging at the plate. I still see huge upside in the guy.

  • Indeed, Jedi. Present company excluded I think Cubs fans basically suck.

    • Jerry in Wisconsin

      I blame sports radio. Before they started talking sports 24/7 it used to be nice talking to Cubs fans. The only way those guys can talk 24/7 is to invent controversies, and usually the rookie is the one making mistakes, so he is the one that gets the blame for everything.

    • Jerry in Wisconsin

      I blame sports radio. Before they started talking sports 24/7 it used to be nice talking to Cubs fans. The only way those guys can talk 24/7 is to invent controversies, and usually the rookie is the one making mistakes, so he is the one that gets the blame for everything.

  • PLCB3

    At one point do you consider him a lost cause? Castro might be 23, but this is his 4th year in the majors.

    • Jedi

      And 2 of those years have been really good, 1 of them was what I’d call average. I said it a couple of months back CAPS, people were going to have to look past his numbers to determine whether the second half of his season was any good – because his numbers were definitely not going to be good. That slump was too steep and too prolonged. So far, people aren’t willing to look past his numbers (because his July slash was .292/.339/.442 – basically what we’d come to expect from him over his first 2+ seasons).

      • OrphanOfColtTheWhiteStocking

        August slash is .214/.241/.250

      • OrphanOfColtTheWhiteStocking

        August slash is .214/.241/.250

      • PLCB3

        Fair enough. Do you think his struggles could be attributed to playing too much? 158 games in 2011, all 162 last year? He might be able to physically handle it, but it will eventually catch up, and I think a few more games off might help keep him fresh and help him be more productive.

      • Jedi

        I don’t see it as any ONE thing. He’s 23 – I don’t think he’s playing too much physically; but he might be a guy that benefits mentally from a day off.

        I also don’t understand why the coaching staff forcing him to change his approach at the plate doesn’t earn more of the fans’ ire. This is a guy who was a proven hitter, and in the name of what amounts to roughly 1 walk per week, they decided to change how he approaches an at-bat mentally. Instead of working with Castro to perfect his approach they tried to break it down and rebuild it into something allegedly better – I only hope they haven’t corrupted him beyond repair. I can’t fathom the logic that tells you to take someone’s most valuable attribute and minimize it (namely Castro’s aggressiveness) – but watch out Yasiel Puig, because there are Dodger fans and executives who want to do the EXACT same thing with him…all so they can avoid the occasional errant throw from RF that leads to a run. It’ll be a rude awakening when they turn him into a shell of his former self.

        You mentioned earlier when I might consider Castro a ‘lost cause’ – not until he fails with another franchise. Mostly because if the Cubs are determined to fit him into the high OBP, so-called disciplined plate approach – I hope we trade him soon, for his own good. I wouldn’t wish what he’s had to deal with on any young player…the best thing for him right now would be a front office and manager that would let him go back to doing all the things that make him dangerous. That includes making aggressive mistakes with impunity.

        Only the Cubs would take a middle infielder who hits .300 for two seasons (while other guys his age are still using metal bats in college!) and try to change his entire thought process at the plate.

  • Joe Aiello

    To answer my own question:
    For hitters, I’d probably use OPS if given only one choice because it encompases the ability to not only get on base, but to hit for power. Ideally, OPS+ would probably be better since it adjusts for park factors, but I don’t understand it as well as I should. The drawback is that OPS tells me nothing of the player’s ability to field, whereas WAR would account for that.
    For Pitchers, I’m struggling and I’m leaning toward Opp OPS that John Dewan talked about in Saturday’s post.

    • John Dewhom?

      • Jerry in Wisconsin

        Is he related to Mark Belhorn?

      • Mark is John’s aunt.

  • Seymour Butts

    Any bad ump list needs C B Buckner near the top. Umps should have to defend their ejections publicly. Their thin skin would be exposed and open to ridicule in that way.
    Best stat: SOCSOG ratio. Seeds on chin vs Seeds on ground. Castro leads the league.

    • Joe Aiello

      MLB should mic the umps, not for TV use, but for evaluation use. It would allow them to evaluate quick hooks because they would generally be able to hear what was said unless someone was saying something from the dugout.

    • Joe Aiello

      MLB should mic the umps, not for TV use, but for evaluation use. It would allow them to evaluate quick hooks because they would generally be able to hear what was said unless someone was saying something from the dugout.

  • fade67

    Regarding the infield fly…this is major league baseball. If the entire team is unaware of the possibility that a runner can advance (and Jay has shown before he likes to tag from 3rd) then maybe they need to rethink their occupation.
    Somehow, I doubt Jeter makes this mistake.

    • Jedi

      There’s a difference between not knowing the rules and taking the outcome of a play for granted. The Cubs seemed to do the latter on Saturday.

    • Jedi

      By the way, Jeter probably catches the ball and permits his momentum to carry him from fair territory into the stands…so the run scores that way too.

      • Dusty Baylor

        Also, let’s compare Castro to a HOF shortstop.

      • Jedi

        Why? I have no requirement that he’s a HOF shortstop…serviceable in the field and solid at the plate would be fine with me (which is exactly what he was until the coaches got to tinkering).

      • Dusty Baylor

        Sorry for the sarcasm Jedi..that was directed at the “I doubt Jeter makes the mistake.” comment. Not enough coffee this morning. I agree. If Castro were even to revert in 2014 to his 2012 levels, I’d be happy with that..(and an improved defense)

      • Jedi

        My mistake…I tend to think Jeter gets way too much credit. If Castro had played on the eventual World Series champion in 2010, he probably would’ve been similarly lionized and his miscues would be quickly forgotten. But alas, he crept into the general conscience when Bobby Valentine spotted him during a Sunday Night broadcast…I doubt he’ll ever be able to fully shake that portrayal.

      • fade67

        Seriously? I’m not a Yankees fan, but it’s Machiavellian to think Jeter’s cred is a product of his being in a WS? He brings it every game and you never see him taking a mental time out on the basepaths, in the filed, at the plate…ever.

      • Jedi

        So if Castro faked getting hit by a pitch there’d be no blowback? If Castro was out at all hours of the morning with a harem and then providing parting gift baskets for them when they woke up the next day, everyone would laud his masculinity? Jeter’s one of the worst fielding SS in baseball and has been for 5 years or so…of course that couldn’t possibly be chalked up to laziness or not enough practice (which is the ONLY thing that Castro’s fielding miscues are ever attributed to). You’re absolutely kidding yourself if you don’t see that the mythical legend of Derek Jeter long ago eclipsed the actual player’s ability. Castro has the opposite problem, his rep undervalues him.

      • fade67

        Not sure you can call Jeter one of the worst fielding SS’s. He’s 29th (all time) in SS fielding percentage (.9763) and has won 5 gold gloves. No worries…you like Castro, I don’t. I could be wrong, but I simply don’t see the mental toughness it takes to play the position at this level. In the end, we’re all Cub fans that want one thing…a perennial contender. Have a good one.

      • PLCB3

        Jeter is one of the worst defenders ever. His fielding percentage is so high because his range is so low. Making an error requires making a play on a baseball. Making a play on a baseball requires fielding the baseball. If you can’t field the baseball, you can’t make a play on the baseball, which means you can’t make an error, which means your fielding percentage won’t fall.

      • Jedi

        I think basically everyone here knows I’m not a worshiper at the sabermetric throne. But using fielding percentage and gold gloves to support someone’s status as a ‘good fielder’ is a really weak argument.

        Rafael Palmeiro won a gold glove while playing a mere 28 games at first base in 1999. And fielding percentage is a stat that lacks context. It’s been demonstrably proven that Jeter gets to fewer balls than virtually any other SS – that alone makes him not a good fielder.

      • PLCB3

        That’s why range factor is a lot more important. Quite frankly, range factor should be expanded to include errors because making an error means you fielded the ball.

      • Jedi

        As for mental toughness – Yunel Escobar has carved out a nice career at SS despite being a very mentally weak individual. He’s made far more public, and far more egregious mistakes than Castro ever will – but his every error isn’t greeted with a Baseball Tonight tease “another mental miscue for Yunel Escobar”…remember this is a guy who put a slur on his eye black and celebrated a home run in a way that caused his own teammates to be outraged. But somehow Castro is the guy who doesn’t use his brain? Cub fans eat that stuff up, and the media is all too happy to keep feeding it to us.

  • Noah_I

    Regarding umpires, I’ve said it before and will say it again. Baseball either needs to start paying Minor League umpires a good enough salary to attract solid talent or just switch to an all computers, video, and man in the booth umpiring format.

    A class A full season umpire makes $2,000-$2,400 a month. Not a terrible monthly wage, but they’re working a max of 9 months a year as an umpire (5 month season, 1 month for playoffs, 1 month for spring training, let’s say 2 months for other paid training). That means the best paid Class A umpire is making $21,600 a year. And umpires cannot be like football referees, who can have full time jobs aside from being a referee. Ed Hochuli, for example, is a pretty big time attorney in the Phoenix area. Being an umpire is the full time job. They either need to pay enough money to attract talented 22 year old new college grads ($40,000 a year with benefits should do it, rising to close to double that in Triple A). On that amount of money, you could also expect young umpires to make it a 12 month a year job. Or just let technology take over. Either way I don’t care, I just hate people calling complete inconsistency and massive screw ups “the human element”.

    On Castro, he’ll live or die on the bat, and that’s my only real concern with him. After a pretty good July, he’s been awful again in the first month of August. But I think we have to stop thinking this sort of occasional absent mindedness is ever going away. Castro may apologize, and may do so repeatedly and sincerely, but I’m all sure we’ve worked with someone who messes up, then apologizes sincerely, then messes up again. Eventually it stops mattering that they apologize. If Castro hits, he more than makes up for the few times a year he fails to show the requisite level of concentration.

    • PLCB3

      Not only that, the NFL pays the refs a healthy salary. Their ref salary alone is enough to have a comfortable middle-class life.

      Side note: Ed Hochuli is 62, but he looks like he’s 32.

      • Noah_I

        MLB umpires actually make quite a good living. The problem is that while NFL referees started doing high school or low level college ball as a side job, then worked their way up continuing to do it as a side job, the lower levels of umpiring has to remain a full time job. So you need people who are willing to spend years and years toiling away in the minors while being paid dirt for the opportunity to MAYBE take one of the few MLB umpiring openings available.

  • Doug S.

    For hitters I’d say you have to take % body fat into consideration.

  • PLCB3

    Hitters – On-base percentage. Because I can only use 1 stat, I can’t get the breakdown between OBP and SLG. On-base percentage tells me how often the batter is getting on base, which is most important. Unless he goes yard, he will need the help of his teammates to score.
    Pitchers – WHIP. I don’t go for the OPS, because again we can’t get the breakdown between OPB and SLG. A pitcher who allows more baserunners is likely to allow more runs.
    I am a stats guy, but I don’t go for this advanced crap like WAR, VORP, wOBA, BABIP, and other garbage advanced stats.

    • cap’n Obvious

      hitters: ability to hit the ball with backspin and authority to all fields.
      pitchers: mound presence. (Assuming they aleady have at least minor league stuff). Mound presence can be defined as the ability to hold runners, and command pitches both in and out of the strike zone.

  • Eddie Von White

    Bad umpires will never go away. All the other sports’ officials still make bad calls even with instant replay. Just ask the 2001 Oakland Raiders. To err is human.

    • Jedi

      Did you see the call on Sunday – that’s not making a mistake; it’s allowing arrogance to override sanity. It’s not normal.

      • PLCB3

        The umpiring crew should be reprimanded for allowing Dempster to stay in the game, and Dempster should be suspended 7 games for hitting him.

      • Jedi

        I was actually talking about the Cubs game…but ok.

      • PLCB3

        That was some bull too. But why was Russell ejected?

      • Jedi

        Typically if you argue balls & strikes vociferously you tend to get ejected. It’s kind of a rule.

      • PLCB3

        The video didn’t make it very clear. I got why Dale was tossed, but I didn’t get why Russell was too. Thanks for explaining

      • Eddie Von White

        I’m not a lip reader, but you didn’t have to be to read Russell’s lips – but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express.

      • PLCB3

        I missed that part the first time. Looked like he said f-ing fish or something like that

      • Eddie Von White

        I think it was the something like that that got him tossed.

      • PLCB3

        And what is your opinion on Sunday’s incident in Boston?

      • I’m outraged. Dempster would have missed his spot three times and somehow managed to give up a long ball before exercising vengeance in a Cubs uniform.

      • PLCB3

        So you’re saying A-Rod would have taken him yard his first time up?

      • Jedi

        Bush league by Dempster. He should’ve been tossed, Girardi was right to pitch a fit. Anyone other than A-Rod and Dempster probably would’ve been tossed.

      • PLCB3

        I can’t believe we’re in agreement! Do you think Dempster should be suspended as well and Girardi should have someone drill Papi if nothing is done about the Dump?

        Also, the Dump can complain all he wants about A-Rod playing during the appeal, but staying the suspension works both ways. If it’s upheld, he serves it once the decision is made. Making him serve while the appeal is pending defeats the very purpose of making an appeal. What if the appeal is thrown out? He doesn’t get back those games he had to sit out for no reason. Giving him the money is a laughable remedy. He’s already been excluded from the games.

      • Jedi

        I think MLB over-suspends for a pitcher hitting a batter. Tossed from the current game is good enough for me (unless it’s at the head and/or after a warning).

        This stuff was much better when the players were the enforcers, but now that can’t really happen. If the Yanks bean someone today, they’re more likely to see an immediate ejection (remember all that Soriano-Hudson nonsense from a few years back).

      • I see it as a noble deed performed by a hero of a man. It is only a matter of time until there is a Toby Keith song about that fateful day.

      • PLCB3
      • That will give him some time to work on his impression of Will Ferrell’s impression of Harry Caray.

      • PLCB3

        Remember when we had Lee and DeRosa and he did the lineups for FOX one day? At point guard, for the North Carolina Tar Heels, Derrek Lee. At QB, for the Penn Quakers, Mark DeRosa

      • I don’t remember, I was only 43 days old.

      • PLCB3

        Wow, real original. I ACTUALLY was only 43 days old on 8-8-88.

      • Jedi

        You’ve got a lot to learn from the future, nondescript mother of your children. By 43 days your age is described in weeks…so you were six weeks old on 8-8-88 (nobody gives a crap about that extra day by then, it’s immaterial). There’s a whole protocol for this kind of thing…you wouldn’t want to screw it up after Woody is birthed by his insignificant mother.

      • I’m kind of hoping Woody’s kidnapped from the hospital nursery to be honest. For his sake.

      • Jedi

        Will Ferrell needs to work on his impression first.

      • AC0000000

        And what is your opinion on Sunday’s incident in Boston?

      • Eddie Von White

        Yes, I saw it and am just as irked as you and everybody else, but I honestly think he thought he saw it correctly and wasn’t about to give in to Sveum or anybody else. If he came out afterwards and took full responsibility and made no excuses would that make any difference?

      • Jedi

        No. “but I honestly think he thought he saw it correctly and wasn’t about to give in to Sveum or anybody else.” That’s the problem. It’s ONLY arrogance that prevented him from asking for help from the first base ump. If he asks Chris Guccione and the result stands, that’s a different issue. But in this circumstance, it was merely an inflated sense of superiority that governed the situation. You can see in the replay, Dale is correctly arguing that it’s Guccione’s call to make and Cuzzi won’t even hear that argument. Is Cuzzi within his rights? Absolutely, he can make that call if he so chooses. Is he beyond stupid for not simply getting help at first base? Absolutely. Could that type of thing be avoided if umpires didn’t brandish their authority at every opportunity? Definitely.

        Someone said it before me – senseless calls like this are NOT ‘the human element.’

    • Jedi

      Did you see the call on Sunday – that’s not making a mistake; it’s allowing arrogance to override sanity. It’s not normal.

      • AC0000000

        The umpiring crew should be reprimanded for allowing Dempster to stay in the game, and Dempster should be suspended 7 games for hitting him.