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Thursday

30

July 2009

0

COMMENTS

Catchers Galore, Wells for ROY, and Yahoo Error

Written by , Posted in General

About Last Night

  • For once, perhaps an injury won’t be that big a deal for this team. Admittedly, I enjoy watching Reed Johnson play, and I think he has been a huge addition for this team, but at the same time, I don’t worry about him being out for the next month. I have no doubt that Sam Fuld can do the job in a platoon with Kosuke until Reed comes back. By that time, the rosters will have expanded and both should have a role on this active roster. On the whole, not the end of the world if you ask me.
  • Randy Wells needs to get serious consideration for Rookie of the Year. Imagine if we have two straight. We’re on our way to being the Dodgers of the 90’s. Woo Hoo.
  • I find it interesting, and it will probably be corrected before the end of the day, that if you look at the pitcher lines for both teams are Yahoo, neither add up to the amount of innings that were pitched. Mitch Atkins pitched 0 innings, but yet the game was still over. The Astros pitched a combined 5 innings of work. That’s awesome.

Minor League Notes

Good to see we don’t have any catchers that are hitting the baseball down in the minors.

  • Welington Castillo (CATCHER) hit 2 home runs
  • Michael Brenly (CATCHER) was 3-for-5
  • Chris Robinson (CATCHER) was 2-for-3 with a walk
  • James Leverton only allowed one run in 5.2 innings pitched
  • Brett Jackson was 4-for-5
  • Ryan Flaherty went 2-for-6 with a triple and three RBI
  • Andrew Cashner went another five innings, only allowing 1 run and lowering the AA ERA to 1.09
  • Jovan Rosa has been named the Midwest League Player of the Week for the week of July 20-26.

Top Prospect Tracker

Photo Op

Junior Lake is batting .260 with five homers and 24 RBIs in 97 games this season. (Paul R. Gierhart/MiLB.com)

  • I have no doubt that Sam Fuld can do the job in a platoon with Kosuke until Reed comes back.

    Fuld and Fukudome are both lefties. Fuld is not able to play the same role that Johnson played.

  • I don’t expect him to play the same role. I do expect him to split time with Kosuke and serve as a competent 4th OF.

  • Sure… I think that he can be a “competent 4th OF,” but it doesn’t make sense for two lefties to be in a platoon. What Reed Johnson brought was solid defense in late innings for Soriano (which Fuld can do), and the RH side of a platoon with Fukudome.

  • sherm

    Maybe Fuld can platoon in rightfield and be the left handed hitting member of that position. By hitting, I mean actually making contact with the ball.

  • Fuld has only a slightly better OPS against RHP this year, in the minors, than Bradley has against RHP in the majors.

    And Bradley has better career numbers against RHP, in the majors, than Fuld has against RHP in the minors.

    Fuld brings nothing at the plate that Bradley cannot do. Bradley brings things that Fuld can’t do, such as, at least occasionally, hit for power.

  • sherm

    Dear Dave,

    It was a chance to take a shot at Bradley. Nothing more. I knew it wasn’t steeped in fact or even half-heartedly realistic. I was merely mocking Milty for his woes from the left hand batters box. I didn’t really think that they should platoon him with Fuld. That would be silly.

    Best Regards,

    Jon

  • cap’n obvious

    And Bradley has better career numbers against RHP, in the majors, than Fuld has against RHP in the minors.

    You would seem to be using Bradley’s entire career to make a point vs. someone who clearly has an issue with the way Bradley is playing THIS year. I, for one, could care less at this point what Bradley has been able to do in year’s past…he certainly sucks THIS year. Plus, Fuld is scrappy and hustles, and he does so for $6.6 million less than Bradley. Most Cub fans can appreciate that.

  • You would seem to be using Bradley’s entire career to make a point vs. someone who clearly has an issue with the way Bradley is playing THIS year.

    I am pretty sure that I referred to both their numbers this year and their career numbers.

    I, for one, could care less at this point what Bradley has been able to do in year’s past

    Yea… I don’t care about the numbers that actually may predict future success either. Oh wait…

    And who cares about “scrappy” and “hustle.” I want good baseball players, and Milton Bradley is a better baseball player than Sam Fuld.

    And oh… since the beginning of June, Milton Bradley has a .419 OBP as a LH. Hell, for the year his OBP against RHP is .376, which is better than Fuld’s minor league OBP against RHP.

    So sure – lets just look at this year. Even then, in one of the worst slumps of his career, Milton Bradley is arguably still the better option against RHP.

  • MJ

    But he’s not driving in runs…..to hell with OBP! 😛

  • Doc Raker

    Fuld can steal a base without going on the DL. I think we are at the sample size to say that Bradley blows chow from the left side of the plate. We basically signed a $10M right handed hitter with a bad attitude and injury prone. I would rather see Fuld in the line up than Milkit.

    With Fulds small sample size in the bigs how can you even compare. All you know is Milkit has underperformed from the left side, let someone else try.

  • I think we are at the sample size to say that Bradley blows chow from the left side of the plate.

    Really? So we should completely ignore the rest of his career?

    And I didn’t compare Fuld’s big league sample size to anything, did I?

    Sam Fuld is a mediocre minor league player. Not sure why so many people expect him to be a decent major league player.

  • sherm

    Just for grins…what are Adam Dunn’s numbers vs Bradley this year? Who has the better batting average? Dunn. More homers? Dunn. More ribbies? Dunn. Better OBP? Dunn. Better OPS? Dunn.

    Milton Bradley? Done.

  • sherm… let me know when Adam Dunn learns how to play RF. If Lou isn’t okay with Hoffpauir playing in RF, he would be miserable having to play Dunn in RF every day.

    Look… as has been said ad nauseam, Milton Bradley has not been good this year from the left side of the plate. There is no question about that. No one is (or has) denying that. But Bradley still has played solid (not great) defense in RF, and has still been on base. A lot. His performance from the left side has also been hurt by an unusually low BABIP. And he has been good from the right side of the plate.

    Milton Bradley has shown over his career that he can hit. And that is a much better predictor of future success than a couple of bad months.

  • MJ

    And if anyone’s paying attention at home, Milton is starting to hit the ball. But as per usual, the same people will continue to bash the guy, and suggest we put in a inferior player.

    Need I remind some of you, about which people here were right about riding the Derrek Lee funk out????

  • cap’n obvious

    And oh… since the beginning of June, Milton Bradley has a .419 OBP as a LH. Hell, for the year his OBP against RHP is .376, which is better than Fuld’s minor league OBP against RHP.

    So the former king of “sample size” now makes the “since the beginning of June” argument. Snarkiness aside, this is what makes you so annoying, Dave…it is your constant need to be right, to the point that you will even contradict yourself in an effort to do so. The numbers are lying in this case. Bradley is not a run producer. His presence in the liddle of the lineup is costing the Cubs runs. It again would appear that you are not watching the games, but only poring over sabermetrics in an effort to make your point.

  • So the former king of “sample size” now makes the “since the beginning of June” argument.

    Limited sample sizes seem to be all you are willing to deal with. You wrote of his career numbers, complaining that I wasn’t looking at this year. So I responded with numbers that you basically asked for.

    I love that you complain that I use larger sample sizes, and then when I give you what you ask for, you complain about that.

    Small sample sizes are a problem because they are not good predictors of future success. That doesn’t mean that you can’t look at a small sample size and say, “Player X has performed well over the last 100 at-bats.”

    The numbers are lying in this case.

    Huh? What are they numbers lying about? That Bradley gets on base a lot? How are they lying?

    Bradley is not a run producer.

    This may be true. Of course, I have never called him a run producer, so I am not sure what your point is.

    His presence in the liddle of the lineup is costing the Cubs runs.

    Maybe… but that isn’t necessarily Bradley’s fault. I would love to see Bradley hit 2nd in front of Lee and Ramirez.

    It again would appear that you are not watching the games, but only poring over sabermetrics in an effort to make your point.

    I watch a ton of games. It is funny that this silly attack comes out all the time, just because I use statistics. Of course, our “watching” often deceives us, hence why people fall in love with people like Fuld, Hoffpauir, or Theriot because if their “hustle” and “scrap,” rather looking at whether or not they are actually productive.

  • MJ

    Of course, our “watching” often deceives us, hence why people fall in love with people like Fuld, Hoffpauir, or Theriot because if their “hustle” and “scrap,” rather looking at whether or not they are actually productive.

    Can I get a Amen from the congregation?

  • get over Dunn

    Simon: Gentlemen, I’d like you to meet your captain, Captain Oveur.
    Capt. Clarence Oveur: Gentlemen, welcome aboard.
    Simon: Captain, your navigator, Mr. Unger, and your first officer, Mr. Dunn.
    Capt. Clarence Oveur: Unger.
    Mr. Unger: Oveur.
    Mr. Dunn: Oveur.
    Capt. Clarence Oveur: Dunn. Gentlemen, let’s get to work.
    Simon: Unger, didn’t you serve under Oveur in the Air Force?
    Mr. Unger: Not directly. Technically, Dunn was under Oveur, and I was under Dunn.
    Mr. Dunn: Yep.
    Simon: So, Dunn, you were under Oveur, and over Unger.
    Mr. Dunn: Yep.
    Capt. Clarence Oveur: Uhh, that’s right. Dunn was over Unger, and I was over Dunn.
    Mr. Unger: So, you see, both Dunn and I were under Oveur, even though I was under Dunn.
    Capt. Clarence Oveur: Dunn was over Unger, and I was over Dunn.

  • rob

    The problem is that the Cubs got Bradley to be a run producer. So regardless of the walks numbers and those things he is not living up to the need that the Cubs acquired him to meet. Maybe this was the organization’s fault because they went out and got a guy to fill a need that he wouldn’t fill. But that is the frustration. And I am not sure he has played a solid right field.

  • MJ

    And I am not sure he has played a solid right field.

    Fielding percentage:

    Bradley: .984
    Fukudome: .995
    Soriano: .956
    Johnson:.988
    Fox: .900
    Hoff: .976

    Not that Fielding Percentage is a great measure, but it gives a little perspective. I’d say he’s solid.

  • I actually think that fielding % is a pretty awful way to look at defense, especially for outfielders.

    Bradley is 15th out of 21 qualified MLB RFers in range factor and 9th out of 21 in zone rating. He is also 12th in fielding %.

    So not great by any means, but relatively average.

  • The problem is that the Cubs got Bradley to be a run producer.

    Did they though? You may be right, but I didn’t see Bradley as a run producer coming into this season.

    I don’t think that Bradley was supposed to be a center piece of an offense. Instead he was supposed to be the final piece.

    Don’t get me wrong – his lack of power has been very disappointing (and way lower than expectations based on previous performance). I just think that he was not expected (at least by me) to be a 30+ HR, 100+ RBI guy. I expected/hoped for a 300/400/500 line with around 20 HR and 80 RBI, and playing 120 games.

  • MJ

    I don’t recall Dave asking whih parameters to look at. I just threw up Bradley’s numbers against all the other OFers on the Cubs.

    I still think range factors are a load of crap.

    but relatively average.

    average = solid

  • I still think range factors are a load of crap.

    i think most/all defensive metrics are, individually, loads of crap. But I think that, collectively, they can put together a fairly accurate picture.

  • Rob Bukowski

    I would agree with average. It is relative because I feel that average is softer than solid.

  • Run producers hit in the 3-4-5 spots in the line up, at least the line ups I write. Bradley has spent much time in those spots hasn’t he? It would then be apparent that the Cubs signed him as a run producer. Hendry might have overpaid for the bestest base on ball guy ever, one must admit that Bradley looks pretty cool flicking the bat aside with machismo after hearing ball 4. Most of us expect some slugging out of our $10M corner outfielders.

    Let’s just all agree it was a poor signing and move on. Moises Alou had a poor first year and turned it around. One would hope Milkit’s worst is behind him.

  • cubbiedude

    Doc, I agree with you. Sluggo hit a home run (from the left side) today and caught one in the vines, so maybe things are looking up.