View From The Bleachers

July 8, 2008

Because I’m Always Right

Filed under: General — Matt @ 5:00 am

If you believe my title, you’re certainly not my wife, or you haven’t been reading VFTB long enough. But I jest. Like Joe wrote yesterday, the C.C Sabathia trade doesn’t have me worried one bit. If Ben Sheets can stay healthy, then sure, the Brewers will have one heck of a one-two punch in their rotation. After that….are you kidding me? Let’s not forget that Sheets is the Kerry Wood of the Miller Valley, and can rarely stay healthy. That’d be one heck of a bet to take. Which one actually makes it through one year without visiting the DL?

Thus far this season, I’ve remained quiet. I can’t anymore. I’m just too gosh darned right to be quiet any longer. And if you can’t sense the sarcasm, you’re certainly not my wife, or you haven’t been reading VFTB long enough. I’ll stand by my four pillars of correct assumptions thus far. Please plant tongue firmly in cheek.

  • Jim Edmonds was a good pick-up, regardless of his stats in San Diego (which is home of some awesome brews, by the way), his former relation to that city just south of us where fans love white polyester pants, and red shirts, and Felix Pie is not likely to see the ivy covered walls of Wrigley any time soon. Awaiting any further moves Jim Hendry makes this season, I believe….No, I know, that this is the move that will pay off in the long run. I love the Johnson/Edmonds platoon.
  • Rich Hill won’t be back. I’d put good money down Pie sees the Friendly Confines before Hill does. Sorry Rich, but I never cared for your soft tossing ways. More than anything, I always got the impression you were soft. Soft in the head, that is. Baseball is more mental than any other sport. You have to be able to suck it up when you’re stinking it up, and push on. You’re ability and mechanics got you here, get back to relying on them, don’t let the grey matter between your ears screw it up.
  • The Cubs don’t care for Matt Murton, because of his defense, or lack thereof. Yes, he’s been steadier this year in short stints, but visions of last year still haunt the Cubs front office. Baseball has a long memory, unless you’re Joe Morgan or Tim McCarver, and what happens years ago will follow you around. Can’t run a good route to a fly ball? Do it frequently? Everyone knows about it. It’s on tape now, dude.
  • I am only truly scared of one thing. Pinella pulling a Dusty, and over working Marmol until his right hand knuckles are scrapping the grass tops on the way to the dugout. Yes, he’s young, and his stuff is electric, but good, golly, gee, please let up on the gas Lou. I’d like Marmol to be a fixture in the pen for a few years. Not a flash in the pan. Let up Lou, let up.Congratulations, you just sat through one of the many theories I spew from my mouth multiple times a week to my wife. To which she has learned, and will often recite back to me, “Because you’re always right.”

Damn straight. Now I’m off to figure out how to rectify the economy…

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Been blogging on VFTB since 2006. It's been a long silly run thus far. I still play baseball in the Chicago North Men's Senior Baseball League.

  • http://www.myspace.com/baronvonbootyslap ManInTheBox

    Looking back at the trade that brought Matt Murton here, the Cubs seemingly made out the best all in all. We got Boston’s #1 pick and star sortstop. Obviously, Nomar Garciaparra didn’t work out long term in Chicago and Murton has been very frustrating to watch. But it doesn’t look like any of the other players included in the four-team deal had much of an impact either. In fact, they may have had even LESS.

    What frustrates me most about Murton is not so much his defense as it is his offense. Sure, his numbers don’t look too bad in spot duty. But it seems like the longer he stays up in the bigs, the less he knows about hitting. His offensive numbers are in a downward projection at the moment and I just don’t see what having him in the lineup ADDS. Other than throwing him in against a left-handed reliever, I don’t know that there is or will be a spot for him on the Cubs big boy team for a while.

    I think your wager that Pie will be up in 2008 before Hill will be is more than safe. It’s about as safe as saying Tim Allen won’t make me laugh (and that’s a REALLY safe bet, folks).

    Finally- kudos for your public position on Jim Edmonds. I said it awhile ago and I stand by it: Edmonds is a great player and a solid addition to our team. Sure, he’s older and not as fast as he used to be, but I have virtually no worries when the ball is headed his way and I love the veteran depth he provides.

    Does anyone want to make a case for the best single season Cubs outfield cast of all time? I’d love to read some opinions and other names.

  • http://www.mindfulmission.com dave

    I have virtually no worries when the ball is headed his wai

    Wow… I sure do. While he has made a couple of nice catches, he has also looked very slow and very tentative out there. And I have seen him take numerous bad routes to balls.

    Even his “great” basket catch he made in deep center looked harder than it was, and would have been made easily by Pie.

    Don’t get me wrong – Edmonds has been a very good addition to this team. But he isn’t anywhere close to a gold glove defensive player at this point.

  • http://www.myspace.com/baronvonbootyslap ManInTheBox

    When we talk about “bad routes” in the outfield, I have to take some of the air out of it because I think it gets overdone. 99.7 times out of 100, unless we’re AT the game, we never see what movement the ball makes when it’s in the air. Playing at in Chicago has been a nightmare for more than just a few big leaguer outfielders. Anyone who’s played outfield at ANY level knows you sometimes take all kinds of turns when making a catch through no fault of your own. When wide receivers do it in football, we call it “making a great adjustment”. When an outfielder does it, we call it “fundamentally flawed”.

    Secondly, though Edmonds MAY have taken a less than stellar route to that catch to start off in Houston, THAT centerfield is considered one of the hardest in all MLB to play.

  • http://www.mindfulmission.com dave

    Secondly, though Edmonds MAY have taken a less than stellar route to that catch to start off in Houston, THAT centerfield is considered one of the hardest in all MLB to play.

    It had little to do with the route he took, thought that was a small part of it.

    It had to do with him being slow.

    Pie would have gotten back there with plenty of time. That is my point.

    Edmonds makes easy catches look hard, and moderate catches look extremely difficult.

    He simply isn’t that good defensively anymore.

  • http://www.mindfulmission.com dave

    Further… the route thing is really the least of my concerns with Edmonds. My bigger concerns are that he looks extremely tentative anytime he comes close to a wall (even more so than Soriano) and that he is SLOOOOOOOOW!!!

    I don’t think he had the speed to play a quality CF anymore.

  • http://www.viewfromthebleachers.com/meetmatt.php Matt Jacobs

    When we talk about “bad routes” in the outfield, I have to take some of the air out of it because I think it gets overdone.

    As an outfielder right now, it’s not over done. I took a terrble route on goundball up the middle just last week. Had I taken the proper angle, I would have cut it out. I didn’t and it went screaming by me and the Centerfielder had to get it. As my back up.

    we never see what movement the ball makes when it’s in the air.

    I think this is an excellent point, as TV doesn’t ever really cover this in broadcasts. Balls hit will naturally curve towards the foul line or towards centerfield. Nothing is really trully straight. The harder the ball is hit, the more likely it’s going to “curve” in one direction or another. If that makes sense?

    It had little to do with the route he took, thought that was a small part of it.

    It had to do with him being slow.

    Let’s not forget Edmonds plays a shallow centerfield. He had to cover MORE ground than Pie would have, playing in his typical start point. Edmonds is slower than he was, but he’s still an exceptional defensive outfielder.

  • http://fullcountfantasy.blogspot.com Steve

    I’d argue that sports like golf and tennis are much more difficult mentally than baseball, but the point about Hill is dead on.

  • http://www.baseballbatdiplomacy.com Buddy

    1. Hill will be back up (my money is with Wasington)
    2. Edmonds has post season exp and can hit post season
    3. Pie will probally be traded (PTBNL)

  • http://www.myspace.com/baronvonbootyslap ManInTheBox

    “As an outfielder right now, it’s not over done. I took a terrble route on goundball up the middle just last week. Had I taken the proper angle, I would have cut it out. I didn’t and it went screaming by me and the Centerfielder had to get it. As my back up.”

    A ground ball can change direction, but not the same way a ball in the air (especially in a high wind area like Wrigley Field) can. If you take the wrong angle on a GROUND ball, that’s one thing.

    I was speaking primarily with regard to pop flies. That’s where my point about watching televised games was about. How many times do we see any outfielder move one way only to double back the other way? Most of us usually think, “Oh, he took a bad route.” But we don’t know where that ball was when the fielder located it.

  • http://www.myspace.com/baronvonbootyslap ManInTheBox

    To clarify, I’m not talking about over persuit. THAT is almost ALWAYS the outfielder’s fault.

  • http://www.viewfromthebleachers.com/meetmatt.php Matt Jacobs

    How many times do we see any outfielder move one way only to double back the other way? Most of us usually think, “Oh, he took a bad route.” But we don’t know where that ball was when the fielder located it.

    If you’re talking a few steps in one direction or another, then I wouldn’t call it a “bad route.” The spin on the ball can dictate if it will tail one way or another too. However, I don’t think you are. I would hope he’d be able to locate it off the bat, but I can quite honestly tell you lighting, and background can make this next to impossible at times. I am in constant amazement that these guys can see the ball as well as they do.

    I consider a bad route, taking the wrong angle. For example, starting one direction then having to make a turn and head another. It’s like going from point A to point B by way of point C.

    I think you’ve got me started on my next post! :lol:

  • http://my.yahoo.com Earl Scott

    Hey Bud, that is exactly what “Sweaty Lou” said about Harden. Let’s keep our shirts on, this guy has been on the DL 6 time, count them, 6 times. Mike Nadel had a good line when he wondered if Harden was traded for to be the 3rd starter or to take Prior’s place on the DL. This a great deal ONLY if he stays HEALTHY. We also need a healthy LEFT FIELDER.

  • http://my.yahoo.com Daddy Smedlapp

    I can only hope Felix “Chocolate” Pie is traded. He does not have the IQ to figure out the strike zone. A good centerfielder he is, but the minor leagues are full of this type. We traded Murton, who can hit, and kept a slug like Pie.

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